Canadian Manufacturing

GM takes charge in energy reduction challenge, saves $90-million

Automaker says it reduced "energy intensity" by an average of 26 per cent within three years


DETROIT—General Motors says 54 of its facilities now meet a voluntary energy reduction challenge issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), saving itself $90-million in energy costs.

According to the Detroit automaker, it needed to reduce “energy intensity” by 10 per cent within five years; it says its 54 facilities exceeded that standard by an average reduction of 26 per cent within three years.

“Energy efficiency reduces our emissions and improves our bottom line, so we are driven to make improvements wherever we can,” GM vice-president of sustainability and global regulatory affairs Mike Robinson said in a statement.

GM says the resulting carbon dioxide (co2) equivalent reduction of 1,256,000-metric tonnes is equal to the electricity needed to power more than 142,069 homes annually or provide electricity to a city about the size of New Orleans for one year.