Canadian Manufacturing

Unifor calls on the Senate to approve anti-scab legislation

by CM Staff   

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Bill C-58: An Act To Amend The Canada Labour Code would restrict federally-regulated employers, including airlines, banks, and telecom companies from using scab labour during strikes or lock-outs or face fines of $100,000 a day.

Unifor applauds Members of Parliament for unanimously passing the amended Bill C-58, otherwise known as anti-scab legislation, today, but now urges the Senate to approve so the law can be implemented as soon as possible. (CNW Group/Unifor)

OTTAWA — Unifor says they are applauding Members of Parliament for unanimously passing the amended Bill C-58, otherwise known as anti-scab legislation, but they now urge the Senate to approve it so the law can be implemented as soon as possible.

“This legislation is about protecting the right to fair and free collective bargaining, including the right to strike,” said Unifor National President Lana Payne. “Workers have fought for generations to get to this day, but there is still a final step.”

“C-58 modernizes Canada’s labour relations system to reflect the current social and economic context of this country, where increased corporate power and wealth requires an effective counter-balance. We call on the Senate to pass C-58 as soon as possible and put it to work without delay,” Payne added.

Bill C-58: An Act To Amend The Canada Labour Code would restrict federally-regulated employers, including airlines, banks, and telecom companies from using scab labour during strikes or lock-outs or face fines of $100,000 a day.

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It passed second reading in the House of Commons with all-party support on Feb. 27, 2024.

Quebec and British Columbia both have provincial anti-scab legislation to prevent employers from undermining the entire collective bargaining process.

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