Canadian Manufacturing

North Fork of Rose Creek celebrates realignment in Faro Mine Remediation Project

Realigning the creek has helped to ensure that clean water and fish in Rose Creek do not come into contact with contaminated water from mine wastes

October 30, 2020  by CM Staff

Overwintering ponds provide additional habitat for fish and wildlife (photo by Cathie Archbould). (Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada)

FARO, Yukon — The Government of Canada is acknowledging the Faro Mine Remediation Project for helping to protect the fish habitat of Rose Creek. Under the North Fork of Rose Creek Realignment Project, clean water has started to flow through a newly constructed channel that will help prevent the contamination of Rose Creek.

“I would like to extend my congratulations to the Faro Mine Remediation Project team, as well as their First Nations and Yukon partners, on the North Fork of Rose Creek Realignment Project,” said Daniel Vandal, minister of Northern Affairs, in a prepared statement. “We know that by working in collaboration with all partners, we will be able to effectively continue to advance the long-term remediation plan while also managing the immediate risks to both the health of northerners and the environment.”

The Faro Mine in south-central Yukon was once the largest open pit lead-zinc mine in the world. While the full remediation plan to clean up the mine is under environmental assessment, certain necessary work like this project have continued at the site as they are critical and essential for protecting human health and safety and the environment.

Realigning this section of the creek has helped to ensure that clean water and fish habitat in Rose Creek do not come into contact with the contaminated water from mine wastes. Contaminated water can now be captured for treatment on site while the clean water safely flows into a new channel that reconnects with Rose Creek. Fish overwintering ponds have also been built to compensate for fish habitat lost due to construction.

Advertisment

This project has been important for the environmental protection of the area and to local First Nations: Ross River Dena Council, Liard First Nation and Selkirk First Nation.