Canadian Manufacturing

Natural Resources Canada gives thumbs up to new timber building in Vancouver

by CM Staff   

Environment Financing Manufacturing Infrastructure Mining & Resources Public Sector Forestry wood construction


The oN5 was named for its location near the intersection of Ontario Street and East Fifth Avenue in the Mt. Pleasant neighbourhood of downtown Vancouver. 

VANCOUVER  — Natural Resources Canada has put out a statement applauding the construction of the oN5, a four-storey mass timber office building constructed from prefabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels.

According to Natural Resources Canada, the type of wood material used to construct the 0N5 is exemplary of using forest resources in a way that is effective. Additionally, the oN5 supports the offices of local design and construction firms.

The federal government has also stated its commitment to establishing a Low-Carbon Building Materials Innovation Hub to support mass timber construction across Canada. Natural Resources Canada says it has invested more than $1.2 million in funding for the oN5 project through its Green Construction Through Wood Program, which encourages low-carbon construction of low-rise non-residential buildings as well as tall wood buildings and bridges.

The oN5 was named for its location near the intersection of Ontario Street and East Fifth Avenue in the Mt. Pleasant neighbourhood of downtown Vancouver.

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“By making effective use of Canada’s forest resources through low-carbon building systems, Canada is becoming a world leader in sustainable wood construction practices, increasing energy efficiency and climate resilience in our communities while simultaneously enhancing the global competitiveness of our forestry, wood manufacturing and construction sectors. That’s why our government is pleased to support projects like oN5 — to help lower emissions, create good jobs for workers and build better neighbourhoods for everyone,” said Natural Resources Minister, Jonathan Wilkinson in a statement.

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