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Liberals and NDP agree to ‘confidence and supply’ agreement, supporting Trudeau’s government until 2025

Trudeau said the deal would focus on issues on which the parties agree, rather than disagree, including action on dental care, pharmacare, climate change, housing and paid sick leave.

March 22, 2022   The Canadian Press

The Liberals and New Democrats have reached an agreement that would see the NDP support Justin Trudeau’s minority government through to 2025.

The deal is a “confidence and supply” agreement effective immediately, Trudeau said on Mar. 22.

This kind of agreement, a version of the deal the British Columbia NDP struck with the Greens in that province in 2017, generally involves an opposition party agreeing to support the government on confidence motions and budget or appropriation votes for a certain period of time.

During a news conference announcing the deal, the prime minister cited the global and economic instability caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as well as the results of last September’s federal election as catalysts of the new arrangement.

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The Liberals failed to win a clear majority in the election and currently hold 159 of the 338 seats in the House of Commons, while the NDP has 25 MPs.

“The message from Canadians was as clear as the mandate they gave Parliament: work together to put people and families first, deliver results and build a better future,” Trudeau said.

“What this means is that during this uncertain time, the government can function with predictability and stability, present and implement budgets and get things done for Canadians.”

Trudeau said the deal would focus on issues on which the parties agree, rather than disagree, including action on dental care, pharmacare, climate change, housing and paid sick leave.

He added that on areas where the Liberals and NDP do not agree, such as a potential increase in defence spending in response to Russia’s attack on Ukraine, such situations will be managed on a case-by-case basis. He added the NDP does not have a veto.

“In the areas where there is not agreement, we will continue to do the things that the Liberal Party was elected to do,” he said. “And we’ll look for support from other parties as necessary as we move forward.”