Canadian Manufacturing

Federal government funds a new container terminal at the Port of Montréal

by CM staff   

Financing Manufacturing Transportation container terminal Port of Montreal


Once completed, the new terminal is expected to increase the annual value of imports and exports handled at the port, generating up to $140 million per year across the country.

CONTRECOEUR — The Minister of Transport and Quebec Lieutenant, Pablo Rodriguez, announced an investment of up to $150 million under the National Trade Corridors Fund to build a new container terminal for the Montréal Port Authority within the city of Contrecoeur, Québec.

The new terminal would increase the Port of Montréal’s container capacity to meet the growing need for cargo transportation and help maintain the fluidity of the Port’s operations. The construction for the new terminal will include:

  • a 675 metre-long dock, including the approach area for ships;
  • a rail network connecting to the existing Canadian National Railway (CN) tracks, including a railway transfer point and freight transfer hub;
  • road access to connect the terminal to the public network;
  • a container handling yard; and
  • operations and administrative buildings.

These improvements will strengthen links between Canada and world markets and provide Canadian companies with the port infrastructure they need to remain competitive. Once completed, the new terminal is expected to increase the annual value of imports and exports handled at the port, generating up to $140 million per year across the country. In addition, this project would increase the total capacity of the Port of Montréal by 55 per cent.

 “The Port of Montreal is an economic driver for the province of Quebec and Montreal, and a key element of our national supply chain,” said Pablo Rodriguez, Minister of Transport and Quebec Lieutenant. “By supporting the Port in its expansion project in Contrecœur, we continue our efforts to strengthen Canada’s supply chain. This is important so that we never again have to go through product shortages like we experienced during the pandemic, or the significant price increases that came along with them. “

Advertisement

Stories continue below