Canadian Manufacturing

IPP&T: The very future of manufacturing hinges on automation

Myers spoke virtually at the Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show (CMTS) on Oct. 5, on the topic “Manufacturing Transformation: Opportunity or Threat?”

October 13, 2021  by Don Horne

A large segment of Canada’s manufacturing workforce will be leaving for good by the end of the decade, and new, younger hires aren’t going to replace them.

If there is any hope of maintaining productivity levels, companies will have to embrace automation and advanced technologies on a scale never before seen, says Jayson Myers, CEO of Next Generation Manufacturing Canada.

“Twenty-five per cent of Canada’s manufacturing workforce will be retiring by 2030. The youngest cohort represent about five per cent of the total manufacturing workforce,” says Myers. “In order to just stay even, we need to increase labour productivity by about 25 per cent – and this is before the company starts growing.”

Myers spoke virtually at the Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show (CMTS) on Oct. 5, on the topic “Manufacturing Transformation: Opportunity or Threat?” And while he does see Canadian manufacturers in a very good position to grow – even outperforming their American counterparts – he cautions that there needs to be an increased adoption of automation to compete in the global marketplace.

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The full article can be found in IPP&T Magazine, a partner publication of Canadian Manufacturing.