Canadian Manufacturing

Ford launches production of Focus Electric model in Europe

First full-electric Ford built in Europe; model built in North America since December 2011



SAARLOUIS, Germany—Ford has launched production of its all-new Focus Electric model in Western Germany—the first full-electric vehicle built by the automaker in Europe.

Built in Saarlouis, Germany, the zero-emission electric version of Ford’s popular compact car features an advanced electric motor and lithium-ion battery powertrain that produces 143-horsepower and has a top speed of 136 km/h.

Focus Electric has been manufactured in North America since December 2011.

Developed as a “One Ford” global vehicle, the German-built version will reach European customers starting in August.

“Focus Electric marks the dawn of an exciting new age of full-electric Ford passenger vehicles in Europe, and demonstrates the success of the One Ford strategy in making this sophisticated vehicle available to our European customers,” vice-president of product development with Ford of Europe Barb Samardzich said in a statement.

“It’s a car that addresses the mobility demands and environmental concerns of today’s car buyers in the most direct way possible—combining performance and advanced technology with a zero-emission powertrain.”

According to Ford, it has invested $21.6-million to integrate Focus Electric production directly into the established Focus production line at its plant in Saarlouis.

“The start of Focus Electric production in Saarlouis is hugely significant for Ford in Germany, and underlines Ford’s position as a leader in automotive innovation,” Mattes said.

The all-new Focus Electric is the first full-electric vehicle to be manufactured in Germany directly from a volume production line.

Each Focus Electric is equipped with a 6.6 kW fully integrated onboard charger that can deliver around 100 kilometres of driving range with two to three hours of charging, and around 150 kilometres of range with three to four hours charging.

The Focus Electric’s powertrain uses regenerative braking to capture up to 95 per cent of kinetic energy normally lost during the braking process, according to the automaker.

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