Canadian Manufacturing

Canadian electricity sector cut emissions 5.8 per cent over course of 2014

With significant reductions over past five years, association targets more by 2020



The CEA says its members have reduced their greenhouse gas emissions by 22 per cent since 2010. PHOTO: Emmanuel Huybrechts,  via Wikimedia Commons

The CEA says its members have reduced their greenhouse gas emissions by 22 per cent since 2010. PHOTO: Emmanuel Huybrechts, via Wikimedia Commons

OTTAWA—The Canadian Electricity Association has reported strong cuts to greenhouse gas emissions over the course of 2014. The member association, which is made up of many of the major providers, including Ontario Power Generation, BC Hydro and Power Authority and SaskPower, reduced emissions by 5.8 per cent last year. The strong results brings the total reduction over the past five years to nearly one-quarter, or 22 per cent.

“I take great pride in CEA members’ actions to reduce their carbon footprint and contribute to healthy Canadian communities”, Sergio Marchi, president and CEO of the CEA, said. “These achievements, combined with the fact that over 80% of Canada’s electricity is already generated from non-emitting sources, will strengthen Canada’s position at the upcoming Conference of Parties meeting in Paris later this year.”

The association noted other air pollutants such as nitrogen oxide, sulphur dioxide, and mercury emissions also fell by 4.3 per cent, 9.7 per cent, and 15.6 per cent respectively, largely due to member investments of approximately $13 billion in infrastructure renewal and modernization. The CEA said the electricity sector is projected to achieve even further GHG and air emission reductions by 2020 as companies invest in carbon capture and sequestration, higher efficiency gas turbines, large-scale and run-of-river hydro, and other renewable energy sources.

“I have been working with CEA member utilities for nearly six years, and I can tell you that this sector is working tremendously hard to be innovative and deliver greater environmental, social and economic value to Canadians”, Mike Harcourt, chair of the Public Advisory Panel of the CEA Sustainable Electricity program, said. “I encourage stakeholders, including governments and regulators, to partner with these utilities to make our communities even stronger and Canada a true clean energy superpower.”

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