Canadian Manufacturing

CN tries to defend safety record after recent train derailments

Thirteen cars on a CN freight train carrying a cargo of oil and liquefied petroleum gas went off the rails near the tiny hamlet of Gainford



GAINFORD, Alta.—CN Rail is defending its safety record after three high-profile derailments involving trains carrying hazardous materials within the space of a month.

Thirteen cars on a CN freight train carrying a cargo of oil and liquefied petroleum gas went off the rails near the tiny hamlet of Gainford, about 80 kilometres west of Edmonton, early Saturday morning.

There were two explosions reported and the community was evacuated as a precaution.

The situation was so volatile that firefighters simply backed off and let the fire burn itself out. They estimated it could take at least 24 hours for that to happen and told a news conference late Saturday that it could be up to 72 hours before residents could return to their homes.

Saturday’s mishap occurred two days after residents in the Alberta community of Sexsmith were forced from their homes when four CN rail cars carrying anhydrous ammonia left the rails. That followed the derailment of 17 CN rail cars, some carrying petroleum, ethanol and chemicals, in western Saskatchewan on Sept. 25.

There were no injuries in any of the derailments.

Despite the cluster of derailments, a CN spokesman said rail remains a safe way to transport materials.

“CN’s safety record has been very solid, in terms of its main track derailments last year, they were the lowest on record,” said company spokesman Mark Hallman.

Federal New Democrat MP Olivia Chow took issue with that assessment. She called on the federal government to take stronger action to improve rail safety.

“The latest train derailment, fire and evacuation tell the Conservative government that vague promise without a clear work plan is not enough,” Chow said in an email.

She said inspections need to be increased and automatic braking systems need to be mandated. Municipalities also need to be given better information about what dangerous goods are being transported on trains.

Three of the rail cars on the train that derailed Saturday caught fire. They were carrying liquefied petroleum gas. Four freight cars carrying crude didn’t break open, Hallman said.

CN said the train was travelling to Vancouver from Edmonton.

The Transportation Safety Board was sending investigators to the scene to determine the cause of the derailment.

In a statement, CN said the track was tested last week as well as last month and no issues were found. It also said an inspection of the train when it left Edmonton on Friday found no problems.

CN was clearly sensitive to the public relations fallout from the derailment. The company brought in some of its top brass to manage the situation, including Chief Operating Officer Jim Vena, who apologized to the residents of Gainford for the disruption and promised the company would get to the bottom of what happened to prevent it from happening again.

There has been intense scrutiny over shipping oil by rail following July’s horrific derailment of a Montreal, Maine and Atlantic train in Lac-Megantic, Que. The subsequent fire claimed 47 lives.

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