Canadian Manufacturing

Cameco restricts operations at its Rabbit Lake mine after underground rock fall

40 non-essential personnel have been removed from the mine, but company has reported no injuries



A remote control scoop tram at the Rabbit Lake mine. The company has restricted operations at the mine as a precaution, removing 40 non-essential personnel. PHOTO: Cameco

A remote control scoop tram at the Rabbit Lake mine. The company has restricted operations at the mine as a precaution, removing 40 non-essential personnel. PHOTO: Cameco

SASKATOON—Uranium miner Cameco has restricted operations at its Rabbit Lake mine in northern Saskatchewan after discovering a fall of rock in a tunnel in the Eagle Point section of the mine.

The company has removed 40 non-essential personnel from the mine as a precautionary measure. Activities have also been restricted to ensure the safety of Cameco’s approximately 600 employees at Rabbit Lake until the area is assessed.

An aerial view of Cameco's Rabbit Lake operations in northern Sask. PHOTO: Cameco

An aerial view of Cameco’s Rabbit Lake operations in northern Sask. PHOTO: Cameco

The company discovered the rock fall when it reopened an inactive section of Eagle Point. Despite the restrictions, there were no injuries or effect on the environment as a result.

The company said production mining at Eagle Point has been temporarily suspended while the assessment is completed, but the Rabbit Lake mill continues to operate as usual.

Cameco has notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and Saskatchewan Mines Inspector and will provide a further update once the assessment is complete.

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